Adult Non-Fiction

Perfectly You : Embracing the Power of Being Real

Summary: 
This book - part autobiography and part self-help- tells the true story of a thirty-something young woman from Venezuela, who realizes her dream of becoming a journalist. Graduating from Columbia University School of Journalism, she first finds a job working for a Spanish language network in Miami and eventually becomes a bi-lingual news correspondent for national TV. Covering such stories as a devastating earthquake in Mexico City to the migrant crisis at the Mexico/US border, to the papal visit, Mariana shares her unique perspective of our world. The premise she teaches is that we must each embrace what makes us unique; our flaws as well as our strengths, and in celebrating our differences, we can paradoxically find the common ground that makes us all human.

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Men in Blazers Present Encyclopedia Blazertannica

Summary: 
The authors, better known as the "Men in Blazers", have for more than a decade, stood at the center of Americans' growing national obsession with soccer or as an Englishman, I would say 'football. Hundreds of thousands of fans, including myself, tune in weekly to their podcast and television broadcast to get their analysis of the previous week's matches and soccer/football news. Rog and Davo fill in all the gaps with this hugely entertaining and idiosyncratic guide to the sport that America is beginning to love. Growing up in England, I have followed football and my team for almost 50 years. This humorous and informative book on the culture of English football will only serve to educate the American fan. I thoroughly enjoyed this book!

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Black Flags, Blue Waters: The Epic History of America's Most Notorious Pirates

Summary: 
Ever wondered what pirates were actually like? Did they bury treasure? Have parrots on their shoulders? Make innocents walk the plank? Most of what you think you know about pirates is far from the accurate historical record. However, Dolin reveals Blackbeard, Captain Kid, Edward Low, and dozens of other pirates lived lives a million times more fascinating than any fictional representation. Dolin examines the complex relationship pirates had with society over time. The American colonies at one point loved pirates and protected them from arrest because they offered cheap goods and valuables. Dolin presents an engaging history and argues the significance pirates had on history is greater than anyone could imagine.

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Wait, What?

Summary: 
The Dean of Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education discusses the art of asking—and answering—good questions. Five questions in particular: Wait, what?; I wonder…? Couldn’t we at least…?; How can I help?; and What truly matters? Using examples from many sources, as well as his own personal life, Ryan attempts to show how these essential inquiries generate understanding, spark curiosity, initiate progress, fortify relationships, and draw our attention to the important things in life. And finally how to answer what he considers to be able answer life’s most important question: “And did you get what you wanted out of life, even so?” This is a light-hearted and sometimes amusing and thought-provoking book, that could change the way you think about asking questions. As a scientist, I was trained to ask questions and consequently found this book a very interesting read. I would recommend this to anyone who is of like mind. I have always said there are no silly questions, and this brief little book adds another dimension to this idea.

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